Attention!

Allan Massie said, “Do you know what a soldier is, young man? He’s the chap who makes it possible for civilized folk to despise war.”

Last night I watched a movie called Holiday‘. An action thriller about a soldier on vacation who uncovers a dangerous plot.

I noticed something rather shameful with the crowd at the theatre during the last 3 odd minutes of the movie. And it was more offensive than the people who speak or scratch their haunches when the national anthem is playing. The last scene showed soldiers on their way back from vacation. The scene has families and loved ones spending a few emotion-filled moments with the soldiers before they leave for another long, trying stint away from home, guarding the country.

During this bit, over 60% of the people at the theatre got up and started leaving. You might argue that it is a movie after all, or that it was past 1:30 am, or even that the climax scene was done. But aren’t we the same people who buy into, and believe the absurdity that is sold to us in the name of Bollywood? Then is this representation of reality so unimportant that we choose to ignore it?

I read some articles a few months ago, about how some random American citizens at a burger joint noticed a few soldiers standing in line behind them. When they got to the counter and paid for their order, they handed some money and instructed the person at the counter that it was to pay for everything the soldiers ordered, and that if the money fell short, to let them know and they’d pay the balance as well. Then there was another story of how someone had left some money and a note on the car of a soldier, thanking them for serving their country, and asking them to take their loved one to a nice restaurant with the money, saying it was just a small token of their gratitude. While these don’t seem like fictional stories, surely they might sound a little dramatic, or like we Indians say, ‘filmy’. Citizens in the US have always acknowledged the futility of sending their soldiers to fight unnecessary wars, and they are grateful and acknowledge this huge sacrifice soldiers make for them, and sometimes try to express this gratitude in their own small ways.

We Indians are aware of the tainted reputation of some cricketers and even some cricketing events, but yet will watch the game with undeterred reverence and willful ignorance, but a few minutes that offer a glimpse into the lives of the very people whose sacrifice enables us to enjoy these trivial and meaningless luxuries, and we get easily bored and leave.

This attitude of educated fellow Indians begs me to wonder what exactly our soldiers are sacrificing their lives to guard. A thankless, money and pleasure-seeking race of self-centered robots?

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“Freedom is the sure possession of those alone who have the courage to defend it.” ~ Pericles

We don’t defend our freedom in any way, at least let us learn to respect it.

9 thoughts on “Attention!

  1. Hypocrisy defines us. Patriotism is fashionable and celebrated like a festival twice a yr.

    Abt cricket matches, it is really absurd how these same seemingly busy ppl will watch d pre match commentary then d match and then again the post match analysis. If tht aint enuf they’d watch d hilights of d same match nxt day…. huh!!

    1. Haha. You bet. For the longest time, I wanted to join the armed forces. If I could go back about 18 years, guess I’d try for the Indian special forces this time.
      Despite having read a bit about the armed forces, the last scene of that movie (and the credits bit) was a revelation, and a hard-hitting one too. Just a tiny part of the huge sacrifices by our armed forces that we easily take for granted. And yet, the people in the theatre didn’t feel it important enough to spend another minute watching.

  2. Hypocrisy defines us. Patriotism is fashionable and celebrated like a festival twice a yr.

    Abt cricket matches, it is really absurd how these same seemingly busy ppl will watch d pre match commentary then d match and then again the post match analysis. If tht aint enuf they’d watch d hilights of d same match nxt day…. huh!!

  3. The last few minutes of Holiday were the best part of it… emotions amplified with the background score… one shld feel privileged to get security at the cost of another man’s life. Disgraceful, those who left without showing even this much respect for our real heroes.

  4. The last few minutes of Holiday were the best part of it… emotions amplified with the background score… one shld feel privileged to get security at the cost of another man’s life. Disgraceful, those who left without showing even this much respect for our real heroes.

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