Tag: better world

In Hope of a Better World

Pic: source
In light of the current Russian war on Ukraine, and similar tensions and wars over the past decades that have left thousands dead, millions homeless and helpless.. here’s stating some obvious thoughts that many are thinking about, but few seem to be saying.
Paraphrasing a recent article on the retail landscape in India, that somehow also captured global turmoil and big bully politicians of some developed nations well:
‘Our country boasts of one of the biggest success stories in capital-guzzling modern retail in recent years, where the largest retail businesses raised billions of dollars in investment. And yet, smaller firms that feed and clothe majority of our citizens, and employ more people than Vietnam’s population, stay restricted by USD 400 billion in unmet credit needs.’
 
This seems to be a common pattern. The largest of startups, even with questionable business models, receive plenty of VC investments, but the banking system seems tough on the smaller businesses with more humble business models, even though they collectively cater to far greater customers.
Or how a tiny percentage of most countries’ population holds 80+% of the wealth.
 
Which brings me to a thought.
Currently, big bully politicians in some developed countries dictating which countries get to have nuclear technology and which don’t.
Instead, what if these big bully politicians’ countries completely dismantled their nuclear stockpiles? And we could see if the world gets any closer to peace, contrary to what their best ‘well-meaning’ efforts have managed over decades.
Thomas Jefferson famously said, “the tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots & tyrants.”
Which brings me to another thought.
Instead of refreshing the tree of liberty, what if fresh seeds were sown? And the old tree uprooted from time to time?
What if politicians and political parties in all countries had a fixed term. Politicians served for a prescribed number of years. And political parties too were shut down after a few decades. The young generation would create a new political party and politicians.
In the current world, many political parties have become bigger and more profitable than most businesses. Ideology-clashes between politicians and political parties and even political ideologies has led to wars and tensions that have left thousands dead, millions displaced, their homes, culture, dreams and families destroyed.
With fixed term politicians and political parties, all the bad blood and grudges, along with the more sinister propaganda and defense profiteering will have a definite end date.
Even the well-meaning, but biased and toothless global peace organizations could pave the way for new ones. Ones where all countries have an equal voice and an equal vote. It cannot be a democracy if a peace organization is reduced to a group of elites who feel as pig Napoleon did when it revised the final rule to read, ‘All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others’.
Current big bully politicians of a few countries only force countries to constantly increase their defense budgets. And that, from mankind’s perspective, is the most absurd investment ever. Do you and your neighbour annually build bigger and stronger walls and protection between your homes out of tension from each other? Yet as nations, this has been normalized.
If countries of the world could try this, we might know if the world sees some of that peace that everyone seems to talk of?
Pic: source

Ferraris and Moral Sawaaris

This post is long overdue. And it is inspired by a dialog from the Hindi movie ‘Ferrari ki Sawaari‘. I had wanted to post about it soon after watching the movie when it had released several months ago. However, it’s screening on tv a few days ago reminded me to complete this post soon.

Ferrari Ki Sawaari (Hindi) translates to ‘a drive in a Ferrari‘.

The movie, is absolutely brilliant, and if you have missed watching it, I strongly recommend it. It does get a little slow along the way, and a tiny stretch of imagination at times, but all in all, there’s a lot to take away from it.

What I liked most about the movie, was a dialog somewhere in the beginning of the movie, where the hero, Sharman Joshi is taking his son to school on his scooter, when, he accidentally crosses a signal light that has just turned red. Both father and son look back with shocked expressions, and the father (Sharman) expresses his mistake and repeatedly regrets it. They both look around but there are no traffic cops there.

The next scene shows both father and son at the nearest traffic police station, where Sharman tells the cop that he jumped the light by mistake. The confused cop asks Sharman if there was a cop around at the time, to which Sharman replies a no. The baffled cop then tells him that since no one saw him break the light, he is free to go. To this, an almost embarrassed Sharman replies that his son saw him jump the light, and that “jo dekhega wahi seekhega” (translation: whatever he sees, he will learn).

That is the most priceless and powerful line I have heard, ever.

In case the meaning or effect of that line was lost out in my poor translation or explanation, essentially what Sharman means is, that even if no one else saw him make a mistake, his son was there and that he has to set an example that his son will learn from, so it was extremely important for him to confess his mistake even if no third-party or enforcing body was around to correct or punish him.

Imagine if each one of us had an internal ethical mechanism that would make us take the right or correct or just choice, irrespective of what the herd does, and irrespective of whether anyone is around to judge or monitor us or not. We could choose our own reasons or purpose for doing so, be it our parents, children, fellow citizens, our country, or just because a particular choice is the right one to begin with, and we know it.

Imagine what we could all achieve, and imagine what a different and better world it will be… Imagine.!

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