A Poem for Design the Future

Ava and Dr. Jimmy Patell, dear friends of mine, were extremely kind to gift me a poem that they wrote about my book on design thinking, Design the Future.

The poem itself is more priceless to me than the book. Really humbling.

Here it is.

Design the Future, what does it portend
What does it say, what message does it send
Does it help Managers in their work place
Or a simple layman in his home space

How can the processes that evolve
A family’s day to day problems solve
Or is it just solely business tools
Being espoused in some management schools

Well to clear the mystery of it all
Shrutin Shetty has taken a call
And made things clear by writing a book
That may well become the subject’s handbook

Friends, it may help giving the book a read
It may assist you in your hour of need
Solve the problem before others do
And get credit that is due to you.

– Ava and Jimmy


If you haven’t picked up my book yet, you can use the code JIMAVA here for a 25% off on the paperback. Paperbacks are also available across leading online bookstores worldwide, and ebooks on Amazon and Kobo.
If you do buy the book, would appreciate a review on Amazon once you’ve read it.

***

Look forward to your views. And if you liked this post, do follow or subscribe to my blog (top right of the page) for similar topics that encourage reflection and discussion. You can also connect with me on LinkedIn and on Twitter.

Design Thinking Basics – 3

In his book ‘Change by Design’,  Tim Brown of IDEO highlights the 3 spaces of innovation. These criteria could be considered as some of the foundation pillars of Design Thinking. Here’s a pictorial representation of the same.

What is Design Thinking?

‘Human-centered Design Thinking’ is a mindset, an approach, and some tools that help solve complex problems or pursue complex opportunities. Unlike traditional problem-solving methods or ideation, it first aims to help understand end users, final objectives or root causes. They could be about actual consumers, business culture, products, services, or even experiences among other things.

Here are the previous two posts on Design Thinking, in case you missed them:

Design Thinking Basics – 1: link

Design Thinking Basics – 2: link

Do subscribe to my blog (top right of the page) to know more about Design Thinking and other topics that encourage reflection and discussion.

Feel free to share your views. I will revert at the earliest.

And if there’s any complex opportunity or problem you are facing at your company, I might be able to help. Get in touch at shrutin[at]ateamstrategy[dot]in

You can also connect with me on LinkedIn and on Twitter.

Design Thinking Basics – 2

In his book ‘Change by Design’,  Tim Brown of IDEO succinctly explains the 3 mutually reinforcing elements of successful design programs. These criteria could be considered as some of the foundation pillars of Design Thinking. Here’s a pictorial representation of the same.

What is Design Thinking?

‘Human-centered Design Thinking’ is a mindset, an approach, and some tools that help solve complex problems or pursue complex opportunities. Unlike traditional problem-solving methods or ideation, it first aims to help understand end users, final objectives or root causes. They could be about actual consumers, business culture, products, services, or even experiences among other things.

We can then work towards innovating and building increasingly relevant solutions. And when attempting to solve complex problems, it helps us get closer to the actual root cause of problems. Then of course, the tools help you innovate and solve problems in a highly effective way.

Haven’t you noticed how, when approaching a situation logically, one can broadly anticipate a solution early on? True innovation however, usually happens in leaps, and results often surprise. Design thinking is a proven way to innovate.

The best part about design thinking: If done sincerely, the results can be as surprising, as they are effective.

Feel free to share your views. I will revert at the earliest. And if you liked this post, do follow or subscribe to my blog (top right of the page) for similar topics that encourage reflection and discussion. You can also connect with me on LinkedIn and on Twitter.

Design Thinking Basics – 1

In his book ‘Change by Design’,  Tim Brown of IDEO succinctly explains the 3 overlapping criteria for successful ideas. These criteria could be considered as some of the foundation pillars of Design Thinking. Here’s a pictorial representation of the same.

And what is Design Thinking?

‘Human-centered Design Thinking’ is a mindset, an approach, and some tools that help solve complex problems or pursue complex opportunities. Unlike traditional problem-solving methods or ideation, it first aims to help understand end users, final objectives or root causes. They could be about actual consumers, business culture, products, services, or even experiences among other things.

We can then work towards innovating and building increasingly relevant solutions. And when attempting to solve complex problems, it helps us get closer to the actual root cause of problems. Then of course, the tools help you innovate and solve problems in a highly effective way.

Haven’t you noticed how, when approaching a situation logically, one can broadly anticipate a solution early on? Yet, we know that true innovation usually happens in leaps, and results often surprise. Design thinking is a proven way to innovate.

The best part about design thinking: If done sincerely, the results can be as surprising, as they are effective.

Feel free to share your views. I will revert at the earliest. And if you liked this post, do follow or subscribe to my blog (top right of the page) for similar topics that encourage reflection and discussion. You can also connect with me on LinkedIn and on Twitter.